What is the difference between 2-D, Drawing and 3-D?

The Drawing portfolio is intended to address a wide variety of approaches and media.  Line quality, light and shade, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, the illusion of depth and mark-making are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc.  Abstract, observational and inventive works may be submitted.  Work submitted in the Drawing portfolio that incorporates digital or photographic processes must address drawing issues such as those listed above. Links to course description can be found at the College Board* website:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/4123.html

The 2-D Design portfolio involves purposeful decision-making about using the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. In the 2-D Design portfolio, you should demonstrate your understanding of design principles as applied to a two-dimensional surface.  The principles of design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale and figure/ground relationship) can be articulated through the visual elements (line, shape, color, value, texture, space).  Any 2-D process or medium may be submitted, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, illustration, painting, printmaking, etc.  Links to course description can be found at the College Board* website:

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/4108.html

The 3-D Design portfolio is intended to address engagement with physical space and materials.  Design involves purposeful decision-making about using the elements and principles of art in an integrative way.  In the 3-D Design portfolio, you should demonstrate your understanding of design principles as they relate to depth and space. The principles of design (unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale and occupied/unoccupied space) can be articulated through the visual elements (mass, volume, color/light, form, plane, line, texture).  These issues can be explored through additive, subtractive and/or fabrication processes.  Examples of approaches include, but are not limited to, figurative or nonfigurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, 3-D fiber arts/fashion, jewelry and body adornment.

Links to course description can be found at the College Board* website: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/descriptions/4111.html